Basketball QUICKGuide

The experts at Summit Orthopedics provide basketball injury prevention tips in their QUICKGuide to prevent injuries and stay safe during the sport.

Protect those ankles

Basketball has one of the highest rates of ankle injuries.  Consider a simple lace-up ankle brace whenever playing basketball; this is encouraged whether you’ve had an ankle injury in the past or not.

Ditch the running shoes

If you play basketball often, shoes made specifically for basketball, rather than standard tennis or running shoes, are worth purchasing.  While you don’t have to get this season’s top-of-the-line must-have shoe, do look for a shoe that has a close fit, good ankle support and is non-skid.

Save those knees, please

The ACL, one of the ligaments that cross in the knee and stabilize the joint, is an easy target for injury, especially in females.  In fact, studies show that females are 2-8 times more likely to injure their ACL.  The good news: there is a great warm up program designed to prevent ACL injury that only takes about 15 minutes and can be integrated into practices.  It was made originally for soccer athletes, but can be easily adapted to basketball.  Check it out at: Santa Monica Sports Medicine Research Foundation – PEP Program

Is stretching really that important?

Short answer: yes.  Basketball players have notoriously tight quads and hamstrings – not good for such an explosive sport.  After that warm-up, add in extra stretching for those areas.  Getting resistance from your athlete?  If the pros find time to do it before every practice and game, they can too.

Off-season, what off-season?

If your athlete plays year-round basketball, they are at greater risk of overuse injuries, even compared to those who play all year but switch sports season-to-season.  If your athlete only likes basketball, ten weeks of rest at some point in the year is encouraged.

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