Foot Orthosis – Use and Care

Your foot orthotics have been prescribed by your specialist to accommodate your particular problems. These orthotics have been custom crafted for your feet only.

Wear in Schedule

It is necessary to follow a gradual increase in wear and allow your body to adapt to any changes provided by your new foot inserts. There is a break-in period of two to four weeks. During this time, you may experience muscle aching or fatigue, which is normal.

  • Begin by wearing the foot orthotics one to two hours the first day.
  • Increase your wear time one to two hours daily until you can wear them all day comfortably.
  • If you are still experiencing difficulties after this time, contact your practitioner or schedule an appointment to make any necessary adjustments. Every effort will be made to make sure that your foot orthotics fit comfortably.

Do not wear your orthotics all day at the beginning—initial overuse is the most frequent cause of problems.

Cleaning and Maintenance

Proper care of your custom inserts is essential to long wear and maximum benefit. Inserts can be removed from shoes and cleaned when needed.

Care of the foot orthotics can depend on the materials used. Plastics can be handwashed with mild soap, rinsed well, and towel dried. Foams can generally be wiped clean with alcohol or baby wipes. Leathers can be wiped with a damp cloth, and suede can be brushed with a stiff nylon brush. Make sure inserts are dry before putting them back in a shoe.

Custom orthotics should always be worn with socks to prevent excessive perspiration, which can damage orthotics. If your feet perspire heavily, your orthotics will require more frequent cleaning.

If you have open ulcers or draining sores, be sure to use an antibacterial soap when cleaning, and always wear clean socks.

Application

Foot orthotics can replace the insole of the shoe and can be transferred from one shoe to another if the shoes are accommodating and the sizing is comparable.

Trimming Tip

Trace your removable shoe insole on the bottom of your custom orthotic and then cut for a custom fit in your shoe. If your custom orthotics are full-length, they will work best in your shoes without the shoe insole.

When to Call for an appointment

See a bracing specialist if:

  • You have developed red areas or pressure sores from your inserts
  • You are experiencing pain
  • You have any questions or concerns
  • You have any significant physiological changes

Never attempt to adjust or repair the inserts yourself.

If you have questions, you are always welcome to reach out to us and we are ready to assist.

(651) 968 -5700

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