SLAP Tears

What is a SLAP tear?

A SLAP tear is an injury to the labrum, a tough, rubbery cartilage ring that surrounds your shoulder’s socket. The shoulder is a ball-and-socket joint, and the labrum’s job is to make the socket deep enough to hold the ball of the upper arm bone securely. It also works to cushion the joint, and several shoulder ligaments attach to the labrum.

“SLAP” stands for Superior Labrum, Anterior (front) to Posterior (back). It means that the labrum is torn at the top half of the shoulder socket. Because the top of the shoulder socket is where the biceps tendon attaches, a SLAP tear may include an injury to the biceps tendon as well.

Learn more about shoulder anatomy

What causes a SLAP tear?

Several things can cause a SLAP tear. They include:

  • A direct hit to the shoulder
  • Traumatic injury, as might happen in a car accident
  • A fall, especially if you try to catch yourself with an outstretched arm
  • Lifting or catching something heavy overhead
  • Repetitive overhead motion, as with weightlifting or sports that involve throwing

What are the symptoms of a SLAP tear?

Common symptoms may include:

  • Shoulder pain
  • Shoulder instability
  • A popping, clicking, or catching sensation
  • Difficulty moving shoulder
  • Shoulder weakness
  • Shoulder dislocation

How is a SLAP tear diagnosed?

The diagnostic process starts by talking with you about your symptoms and conducting a detailed physical examination. Diagnostic imaging, including X-rays and MRI scans, can be useful for a diagnosis as well.

To be certain of the diagnosis, shoulder arthroscopy may be necessary.

How is a SLAP tear treated nonsurgically?

Many SLAP tears can be treated nonsurgically. The goals of treatment are to relieve pain and restore strength to the involved shoulder. Nonsurgical treatment options include:

  • Rest
  • Anti-inflammatory medication
  • Steroid injections
  • Physical therapy

What are the surgical treatment options for SLAP tears?

If a nonsurgical approach doesn’t provide satisfactory function, or if you are active and use your arm for overhead work or sports, then surgery is most often recommended because many tears will not heal without surgery.

Most of the time, arthroscopic (minimally invasive) surgery is appropriate. However, some large tears may require traditional surgery, using a longer incision to repair the torn labrum.

Summit Orthopedics offers comprehensive sports medicine expertise

From Olympians to pro athletes to kids in youth sports and those that just want to be more active—Summit Orthopedics delivers expert care by fellowship-trained sports medicine physicians. If you are recently injured or concerned about ongoing pain, Summit Orthopedics sports medicine specialists have the expertise to evaluate your discomfort and develop a plan to quickly and safely help you get back to being active.

Start your journey to stronger, healthier athletic condition. Find your sports medicine expert, request an appointment online, or call us at (651) 968–5201 to schedule a sports medicine consultation.

Summit has convenient locations across the Minneapolis-St. Paul metro area, serving Minnesota and western Wisconsin. We have state-of-the-art centers for comprehensive orthopedic care in Eagan, MNVadnais Heights, MNPlymouth, MN, and Woodbury, MN, as well as several additional community clinics.

More resources for you:

Also see...

  • Summit Sports Medicine Pros Partner with Area High Schools

    Summit Orthopedics’ team of sports medicine physicians and providers — both surgeons and nonsurgical specialists — are proud to support Minnesotans’ healthy, active lifestyles for people of any age. Our sports medicine services help people with active jobs, recreational sports enthusiasts, and athletes of… Read More.

  • Can You Do Anything to Fix a Broken Toe?

    Summit Orthopedics foot and ankle surgeon Samuel Russ, M.D., discusses the options available to help broken toes heal.

  • Meet Samuel Russ, M.D.

    Summit foot and ankle orthopedic surgeon Samuel Russ, M.D., helps people get back on their feet so they can enjoy their lives.