What Is The Best Age For A Hip Replacement?

A hip replacement is often viewed as a procedure for elderly patients. We explain why hip function—and not patient age—is a better way to evaluate when to consider a hip replacement.

Many people with hip pain wonder if they will need a hip replacement, the best age for a hip replacement, and if they can preserve their active lifestyle.

Power of exercise for joint health

The Twin Cities are widely recognized as a great place to enjoy a lifestyle that emphasizes fitness. We love to walk, run, bike, compete, and enjoy water sports on our famed 10,000 lakes. Our activities don’t merely bring us pleasure; they are also a critical component in maintaining health. The research is overwhelming: exercise is one of the most powerful preventative steps we can take to keep our bones healthy now and ensure an active, injury-free future.

As wonderful as exercise is for us, it is also true that sports injuries and the wear and tear of repetitive joint impact can be a risk factor for osteoarthritis. This condition occurs when the cushioning cartilage that protects the joints gradually wears out. Osteoarthritis affects nearly 27 million adults in our country.

Challenges of arthritis

The lifestyle impact of osteoarthritis varies from patient to patient. Although osteoarthritis is more common after age 45, it can begin in young adulthood. Generally, the symptoms can be treated with conservative, noninvasive treatments to slow down disease progression and relieve joint pain. When conservative treatments cease to be effective, your doctor may talk with you about a surgical hip replacement.

What’s the best age for a hip replacement?

We find it helpful to consider hip function—instead of age—when we are evaluating the timing for a hip replacement. If medication, physical therapy, and other conservative approaches no longer manage pain effectively, your lifestyle may be affected whether you are 46 or 76.

If you embrace regular exercise and sports as part of your healthy lifestyle, advanced osteoarthritis can limit daily activities and curtail the hobbies that keep you fit. In these circumstances, it is appropriate to talk with your orthopedic doctor about whether a hip replacement will help you preserve and continue to pursue your active lifestyle. By protecting the fitness habits you love, you are also protecting your long-term health.

More resources for you

Share this on
Share on FacebookShare on TwitterPin on Pinterest

Also see...

  • hip pain surgical options

    Ask Dr. Hansen: What Are The Surgical Options For Hip Pain?

    When patients complain of hip pain, we’ll try first to treat pain with nonsurgical treatment. If conservative treatments fail to control pain, Dr. Hansen explains the available surgical options you might consider.

  • Advanced Certification Award

    Summit Orthopedics’ Vadnais Heights Surgery Center Receives The Joint Commission’s Advanced Certification for Total Hip and Total Knee Replacement – The facility is one of just two nationwide to receive the prestigious certification.

  • Arthritis Care: Knee, Shoulder, Hip

    From evaluation and diagnosis to prevention, restoration, and rehabilitation, we provide a wide range of conservative and progressive care options for joint conditions.