How Long Will My Hip Replacement Last? [Video]

Ask the Expert: Hip Video Series

About the video: How long will my hip replacement last?

Listen to our experts, Jerome Perra, MD and Kris Breien, MD discuss how long you should expect your hip replacement to last.

Meet Dr. Kristoffer Breien

Dr. Breien’s approach: “I tend to be more conservative in my approach, reserving surgery as a last option. In essence, I strive to care for patients and their problems in the same manner my family and I expect to be treated when we seek medical attention.”

Dr. Breien’s education: Dr. Breien received his undergraduate degree at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado. He went to Creighton University for medical school and his residency at Creighton-Nebraska University Health Foundation in Omaha, Nebraska.

Meet Dr. Jerome Perra

Dr. Perra’s approach: “My goal is always to return the patient to his or her highest level of function, and to individualize post-operative and rehabilitation expectations.”

Dr. Perra’s background: Dr. Perra earned his undergraduate degree at St. John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota, and he went on to complete his medical studies at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. His Orthopedic Surgery residency took place at Madigan Army Medical Center in Tacoma, Washington.

When to seek treatment for your arthritis

Arthritis doesn’t have to spell the end of an active life. If you are experiencing worrisome symptoms or persistent pain, the renowned arthritis specialists at Summit Orthopedics can help. We work with you to confirm a diagnosis and develop an appropriate conservative treatment plan. If nonsurgical treatments fail to support your lifestyle goals, fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons will consult with you and discuss appropriate surgical options. Summit is home to innovative joint replacement options. Our Vadnais Heights Surgery Center is one of only two surgery centers nationally to receive The Joint Commission’s Advanced Certification for Total Hip and Total Knee Replacement.

Start your journey to healthier joints. Find your arthritis expert, request an appointment online, or call us at (651) 968–5201 to schedule a consultation.

Summit has convenient locations across the Minneapolis-St. Paul metro area, serving Minnesota and western Wisconsin. We have state-of-the-art centers for comprehensive orthopedic care in Eagan, MNPlymouth, MN, Vadnais Heights, MN, and Woodbury, MN, as well as additional community clinics throughout the metro and southern Minnesota.

Video Transcription

Hip replacement’s been around since the 1970s. And the typical answer 25,30 years ago was that a hip replacement should last 10 to 15 years, and then some of them come loose and we have to redo them. We found out over time that the weak spot, the thing that made hips fail, was the plastic. We had a metal-on-plastic surface, and if the plastic started to break down, it gives off a million little particles of plastic, and the body doesn’t like that. Fifteen, 17 years ago, orthopedic surgeons and scientists started to figure this out, and they’ve come up with many different ways of improving the plastics. And the plastics are now much more durable. They’re cross-linked so the plastic doesn’t wear down, doesn’t break down into these tiny particles. And we think 25 to 30 years is now very reasonable or something we can expect for a hip to last because the plastic isn’t wearing out at the same rate. Ultimately, the plastic will wear out. When the plastic wears out, you can just change the plastic. So you don’t have to change out all your titanium parts. Generally, you would remove the head or the ball and take out the plastic, put in a new plastic, a new ball, put it back together. So you don’t have to replace the whole thing. And that’s what young people will ask. People in their 40s and 50s will say, “Geez, I should wait till I’m 65 or 70. That way this’ll be the only surgery I ever have.” And that’s true. But at the same time, if you’re so miserable, you can’t walk, you can’t exercise, you can’t sleep, the potential is to have your hip replaced and then 20 years or 30 years from now to replace just the plastic or just the ball and plastic with continued good result.

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  • Jerome Perra MD

    Jerome Perra, M.D.

    “My goal is always to return the patient to his or her highest level of function, and to individualize post-operative
    and rehabilitation expectations.”

    More about this expert

  • Kristoffer Breien, M.D.

    “I tend to be more conservative in my approach, reserving surgery as a last option. In essence, I strive to care for patients and their problems in the same manner my family and I expect to be treated when we seek medical attention.”

    More about this expert

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